Project Description

Project Brief

This is a video for The Long Afternoon’s only officially recorded cover version, from the Regression album. The Long Afternoon deviates drastically from the instrumentation and tone suggested by Al Stewart’s original recording, choosing to follow the narrative into territory simultaneously more spare and more shadowy. The video features images of the objects that comprise the the Internet’s raison d’etre, combined with snippets of text selected from foundational works of fiction and other documents of interest.

Visual A

Visual B

Prerequisites

Assembling the video for The Long Afternoon’s reinvention of “The Year of the Cat” involved procuring feline imagery from a range of sources, culling potential aphorisms from favored volumes of lore and whimsy, and extensive testing of sequence and different combinations of cats and catchy thoughts. It may or may not be true that at least one member of the Long Afternoon never heard the original “Year of the Cat” before recording this version.

Noirish sensibilities 98%
Disregard for precedent 92%
Herding cats 96%
Patchouli 98%

Initial Debate

The Long Afternoon considered taking the music they created for “The Year of the Cat” and using it as the basis of a new song, but ultimately concluded the music and Al Stewart’s lyric were inextricably linked.

Draft & Revisions

One member’s aversion to patchouli nearly derailed the initiative to bring “The Year of the Cat” to the masses. A promise, witnessed and notarized, to limit the presence of patchouli in the studio to the single word in the lyrics was necessary.

Mellow Gold

The exploration of the unplumbed depths of a soft-rock classic from the 1970s, though initially met with uncertainty by the Long Afternoon’s directors, opened unexpectedly rich possibilities. Further research into the secret tonalities of superficially unsuited songs is under way.

Excellent Results

The Long Afternoon’s version of “The Year of the Cat” is frequently assumed to be a song that originated with the band, rather than a cover version. This reaction is appropriate and redeems the decision to record a cover version in the organization’s view.